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Geology of Lived Objects: Mercury Bureau

Jan 24, 2016
Founded in 2014, Toronto-based Mercury Bureau develops lighting and accessory designs with close consideration for how objects impact our everyday. Born as the brainchild of geology-trained Shane Krepakevich,...
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Founded in 2014, Toronto-based Mercury Bureau develops lighting and accessory designs with close consideration for how objects impact our everyday. Born as the brainchild of geology-trained Shane Krepakevich, each design lends itself to a culture of  aesthetic and formal investigation. However adapted to customisation, products such as Trace Lamp, Keyhole Wall Hook or Pivot Table emanate refined functionalism. TLmag spoke to the Krepakevich about his trajectory and philosophy.

TLmag: What aspects of a background in geology transcends your creative approach?

Shane Krepakevich: Studying geology imprinted a strong sense of research onto everything I do. I carry forward an attitude and a methodology that allow me to approach my work with openness and focus. I pursue each project with persistence as along as it seems fruitful, while always trying to remain open to a shift in approach or production.

TLmag: How does your artistic experience inform your design practice? 

S.K.: My experience as an artist brings the value of studio practice into my design work. This complements the research focus I inherited from the study of geology – giving me the tools to realise my ideas while keeping a close watch on the potential that can come directly from actively working with materials, processes, and forms. Having spent years looking for alternative means for engaging the objects I created as an artist, it became clear that the field of design already contained many of the answers I was looking for. Design and its experience provides a much different person-to-object relationship. I love the familiarity, touch, complicity and duration of our connection to everyday objects. 

TLmag: You talk about how objects can make a difference in our lives. Please describe how the Keyhole Hook and Pivot Table achieve this ideal. 

S.K.: Much if not most of our lives are spent indoors, in rooms, surrounded by materials, finishes, and objects. Interiors drive and host our experiences. I develop my designs with this phenomenon in mind. I look to existing products and consider how my own can offer a point of difference – not as an overt display of difference – but as subtle inflections on the space of our daily lives. I hope to provide people with at least a small opportunity to shape their environment, to craft the character and functionality of their interiors.

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Cut Pendant
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Cut Pendant
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Keyhole Wall Hooks
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Keyhole Wall Hooks
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Keyhole Wall Hooks
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Keyhole Wall Hooks
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Trace Lamp
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Trace Lamp
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Trace Lamp
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Trace Lamp
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Trace Lamp
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Pivot Table
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Shane Krepakevich

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