×

Subscribe to our newsletter

Highlights From the Previous Week, Partnered Events and Haikus. View our Newsletter archive

Paul Kasmin Gallery Collaborates With Sotheby’s

Naturalia is the first collaborative exhibition between the Sotheby’s Old Masters Department and the Paul Kasmin Gallery, where it is showing until March 4.

Scroll right to read more ›
Text by Nadine Botha

When Albrecht Dürer drew his famous rhinoceros in the 16th century, he’d never even seen one. Yet, this drawing would determine people’s idea of a rhinoceros for another 150 years or so. Juxtaposed next to Walton Ford’s monumental Loss of the Lisbon Rhinoceros, painted in 2008, these are the types of stories that emerge in the Naturalia exhibition.

Naturalia is the first collaborative show between the Sotheby’s Old Masters Department and the Paul Kasmin Gallery in New York, where it is showing until March 4. Curated by Danny Moynihan, the show comprises 16th, 17th and 18th century works paired with work by contemporary artists such as Mat Collishaw, Mark Dion, Damien Hirst and Sam Taylor-Johnson.

The contrast between old and new is a revelation. Given our media-saturated contemporary times, without this contrast, it is difficult to conceive of the marvel and curiosity that centuries-old artists experienced when exploring nature in an expanding new world. The sense of fear, admiration, exoticism and paradise all come through in the works.

Turning to the contemporary artists, how our perception of nature has changed is revealed. Damien Hirst‘s Devastation, for instance, is covered with dead flies that evoke both the inevitability and beauty of mortality. Decay and beauty also come through in Mat Collishaw’s The Venal Muse, Fenside, Mark Dion’s Stork and Sam Taylor-Johnson’s Still Life video installation.

Also on show at the Paul Kasmin Gallery is COPLEY: WOMEN, with over 20 paintings by the late artist William N Copley. The exhibition explores Copley’s preoccupation with the opposite sex, given how in the 1950s he defied painterly trends by making personal and narrative works.

Loss of the Lisbon Rhinoceros (2008) by Walton Ford, watercolor, gouache, pencil, and ink on paper. Courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery
Loss of the Lisbon Rhinoceros (2008) by Walton Ford, watercolor, gouache, pencil, and ink on paper. Courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery
The Rhinoceros, (circa 1620, woodcut made in 1515) by Albrecht Dürer, woodcut on paper.
The Rhinoceros, (circa 1620, woodcut made in 1515) by Albrecht Dürer, woodcut on paper.
PK 23169
PK 23274-image
Installation view of Naturalia. Photo: Diego Flores
Installation view of Naturalia. Photo: Diego Flores
An Owl Fighting Other Birds (circa 1630-1678) by Jan Brueghel the Younger and Studio, oil on copper.
An Owl Fighting Other Birds (circa 1630-1678) by Jan Brueghel the Younger and Studio, oil on copper.
Installation view of Naturalia. Photo: Christopher Stach
Installation view of Naturalia. Photo: Christopher Stach
A Thistle and a Caterpillar (circa 1560-1580) by Jacques Le Moyne de Morgues, gouache on vellum.
A Thistle and a Caterpillar (circa 1560-1580) by Jacques Le Moyne de Morgues, gouache on vellum.
Esopus Creek Bug Drop (1996) by Fred Tomaselli, mixed media and resin on wood panel. Courtesy of the artist and James Cohan, New York.
Esopus Creek Bug Drop (1996) by Fred Tomaselli, mixed media and resin on wood panel. Courtesy of the artist and James Cohan, New York.
A Study of Insects; A Study of a Beetle and Other Insects: A Pair (early 17th century) by the Dutch School, gouache on vellum.
A Study of Insects; A Study of a Beetle and Other Insects: A Pair (early 17th century) by the Dutch School, gouache on vellum.
Insecticide 18 (2009) by Mat Collishaw, c-type photographic print.
Insecticide 18 (2009) by Mat Collishaw, c-type photographic print.
Installation view of William N. Copley: Women. Photo: Diego Flores / Paul Kasmin Gallery
Installation view of William N. Copley: Women. Photo: Diego Flores / Paul Kasmin Gallery
Installation view of William N. Copley: Women. Photo: Diego Flores / Paul Kasmin Gallery
Installation view of William N. Copley: Women. Photo: Diego Flores / Paul Kasmin Gallery
TL Mag online 300x250 NEOLITH
Back

Articles you also might like