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Noisy Jelly by Pluvinage & Cauvard

Using the special texture of the jelly and turning it into a musical material! That challenge was taken on by two students from the ENSCI, Raphaël Pluvinage (product design) and Marianne Cauvard (food design). Noisy Jelly is a clever way to take advantage of the famous jelly texture. The project...
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Using the special texture of the jelly and turning it into a musical material! That challenge was taken on by two students from the ENSCI, Raphaël Pluvinage (product design) and Marianne Cauvard (food design). Noisy Jelly is a clever way to take advantage of the famous jelly texture. The project is presented in a box with all the material and explanation needed:

1. put some water and a few grams of agar in a mold

2. wait 10 minutes

3. place the jelly on the game board and

Just by touching the jelly shapes, the contact is detected and transformed into an audio signal!  Technically, the game board is a capacitive sensor, and the variations of the shape and their salt concentration, the distance and the strength of the finger contact are detected and transformed into the audio signal. This object aims at demonstrating that electronics can have a new aesthetic, and can be imagined as a malleable material to be manipulated and experimented with.

tl.mag #14, coming out at the beginning of May 2012, will be completely dedicated to (objects of) desire.  The Spotted section at the beginning of the magazine showcases the tl.mag editorial team’s favourites, ordered in 7 categories of opposites: decelerate & accelerate, intimacy & exuberance, discretion & audacity, cocooning & escapism, heritage & immateriality and useful & futile.  Discover more exciting projects in these categories on the tl.mag blog!

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