×

Subscribe to our newsletter

Highlights From the Previous Week, Partnered Events and Haikus. View our Newsletter archive

Material Tendencies: Vincent Van Duysen

Aug 6, 2018

Known for his minimalist aesthetic, Belgian architect and designer Vincent van Duysen aims to create aesthetically pleasing atmospheres with a sort of warm sensuality. His work is characterised by an understated elegance, clean lines and essential forms.

Scroll right to read more ›
Text by Anita Hackethal

Architonic spoke with Vincent van Duysen about the philosophy behind his architecture, interiors and design projects, and about his passion for natural colours and materials.

Vincent van Duysen: I love to work with any kind of wood, from lighter to darker colours. For both my designs and architectural projects, I mainly use natural materials. I like the sensual perception of wood, stone, natural fibres, and so on. You can see, feel and even smell the material. I don’t believe in any kind of materials where technology dominates.

My architecture is in a way about the essence of space. I try to create balanced spaces that are bathed in natural light and then I add layers of, for the most part, natural colours and materials to create ambiences that are more contemplative, serene and calm. I think it is essential to give space to the objects that surround us. Open spaces in between help to calm your restless mind. We have very hectic lives and are living in a world that is dominated by technology, so for me it is important to slow down the process.

This article originally appeared on Architonic, where TLMag presents articles in French and English.

DCII Residence in Tielrode, Belgium, 2011. Photography by Koen Van Damme
Vincent van Duysen
Step sofa 05 for viccarbe, 2013
Vincent van Duysen
Neutra Easy chair for Tribu, 2008
Vincent van Duysen
TR Residence, Knokke, Belgium, 2015. Photography by Dirk Caremans
Vincent van Duysen
Brabo Lounge Family for Herman Miller, 2013
Back

Articles you also might like

Vincent Fournier

In this extensive conversation between Christian Larsen and photographer Vincent Fournier, we learn about the aesthetics and interests behind ‘Brasília, A Time Capsule’, a series which investigates the architecture, landscape, and people of Brasília (Brazil).

Collaborator of our sister gallery Spazio Nobile, Matthias Kohn, developed a project about home, nature, and hospitality. In essence, the concept is based on the idea of placing furniture, most often used in private interior settings, thus adapted for this type of use, and suggesting comfort, in exterior settings, where the impact of the piece on the respective surroundings is allowed to develop fully.

If her concept for building an island bridge out of salt in the middle of the Dead Sea becomes a reality, artist Sigalit Landau will have created a symbol for connection and hope in the Middle East