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Norway’s Forces of Nature and Forces of Art Unite

Three renowned Norwegian artists depict the ‘Forces of Nature’ that shape their native country in versatile ceramic and tapestry artworks

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Photography by Gérard Jonca

Gathered at the National Ceramics Museum of Sèvres are 65 ceramic and tapestry works that portray three dramatically versatile yet connected visions of Norway. The exhibition, Forces De La Nature [Forces of Nature], presents the abstracted depictions of Norway’s striking landscapes and powerful climate. The three internationally renowned artists Kari Dyrdal, Torbjørn Kvasbø and Marit Tingleff depict their home country’s spectacular scenography.

Curated by Christine Germain (Director of the Heritage and Collections Department of the National Ceramics Museum) and Frédéric Bodet (Head of the Modern and Contemporary Collections) the exhibition includes only contemporary work dating from 2000 onwards.

On display are also large-scale works that were commissioned specifically to take advantage of the vast exhibition space at Sèvres. This is particularly fitting for these three artists who all enjoy working on large pieces.

Marit Tingleff is well-known for her ceramic plates and mural plaques, that sometimes exceed two meters in length and one meter in width. Her ceramics push the limits of the medium, making the ceramic forms into landscape canvases which are then painted with ceramics slips in deep, vibrant and often copper-oxide based colors.

Meanwhile, Kari Dyrdal utilizes new digital technologies and contemporary weaving techniques to reinvent the tapestry-making tradition. Her pictorial approach gives textural qualities to the textile work and plays with illusion, abstraction and realism.

Finally, Torbjørn Kvasbø explores the Norwegian landscape through his sculptural ceramics. His works are recognizable by their iconic tubular elements and bright colors. He also works with energetic large-scale formats with the aim of triggering visceral emotional reactions.

Forces of Nature was organized in partnership with Norwegian Crafts, the KODE Art Museums and Composer Homes, the Sørlandet Kunstmuseum in Kristiansand (SKMU), with the support of the Norwegian Embassy in France.

Despite their diverse approaches, the three Norwegian artists come together to create a portrait of the Nordic country that shows the striking power of a landscape shaped by the wild Norwegian climate.

‘Forces de la Nature’ [Forces of Nature] will be on display until April 1

Cover image:
Kari Dyrdal, Red sea, 2015, L 318 x H 279,5 cm, © Gérard Jonca – National Ceramics Museum of Sèvres

Forces of Nature
Marit Tingleff 1 Light/Earth, 2 Dark, 3 Sea/Cold, 4 Growth 250 cm x 140 cm x 30 cm/ 400 kg per piece with stand (c) Gérard Jonca - National Ceramics Museum of Sèvres
Forces of Nature
Exhibition View: 'Forces of Nature - Three Norwegian Artists' at the National Ceramics Museum of Sèvres
Forces of Nature
Kari Dyrdal Jacquard Knots Yellow 2010 L 265 x Ht 160 cm (c) Gérard Jonca - National Ceramics Museum of Sèvres
Forces of Nature
Exhibition View: 'Forces of Nature - Three Norwegian Artists' at the National Ceramics Museum of Sèvres
Forces of Nature
Exhibition View: 'Forces of Nature - Three Norwegian Artists' at the National Ceramics Museum of Sèvres with Torbjorn Kvasbo Cluster of vases Height 200 x diam 350 cm / 500Kg
Forces of Nature
Kari Dyrdal Jacquard Knots Yellow 2010 L 265 x Ht 160 cm (c) Gérard Jonca - National Ceramics Museum of Sèvres
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