×

Subscribe to our newsletter

Highlights From the Previous Week, Partnered Events and Haikus. View our Newsletter archive

Sonic Arcade at MAD

Oct 20, 2017

This autumn and winter, New York’s MAD Museum dedicates the majority of its galleries to an immersive series of interactive installations that reveal the wide history and application of sound art.

Scroll right to read more ›
Text by

It’s often hard to materialise the invisible sense of sound but through a long history of interventionary endeavours, artists and designers have attempted to visualise this resonate yet ethereal element. Beyond the use of advanced recording technologies, many have employed the supporting ingredients of light, texture, photography, space, physical materials and actual instruments to express message or meaning. Mounted throughout New York’s Museum of Arts and Design, Sonic Arcade (on view till 25 February, 2018) is an interactive procession of sound-based installations and interactive exhibits that reveal the scope of this abounding medium.

Featuring work by over twenty talents, the multimodal showcase emphasises immersion. Visitors are asked to reconsider the perception of their surroundings and museum etiquette. Aptly, Sonic Arcade breaks with such conventions and asks guests to touch, play, and listen. In some cases, as in evident with the Polyphonic Playground by Studio PSK or Knotted Gate Presence Weave by MSHR, a visitor’s very presence establishes audible response. Whereas the former requires one to engage in the haptic performance of sitting, pushing, climbing and stroking various surfaces of a play structure with embedded sensors, the latter simply requires them to walk through an cybernetic environment to create new orchestrations of sound, light, and colour.

Qualities of craft, design, and materiality are not overlooked. Julianne Swartz’s Sine Body installation combines ceramic and blown glass to create iterative vessels that generate different oscillation sound waves. Various works transmute the apparatus of musical instruments that can be literally played through either digital feedback or physical tone. Propagation (Opus 3) by Naama Tasabar is a wall mechanism that emulates most string-based percussion instruments. Employing the museum wall as a literal sounding board, the installation transforms the institution’s architecture into a resonate body itself. Other showcases look to the role of documentation and the highly influential role of radios  in changing music culture since the early to mid Twentieth Century. Subject to Gesture by Robert Aiki Aubrey Lowe even allows guests to tempt their hands at DJ-ing while exploring the haptic connection of one’s dexterity and the synthetic sound produced through analog synthesizers.

Sonic Arcade: till 25 February 2018
MAD Museum: 2 Columbus Circle, New York

Propagation (Opus 3) by Naama Tsabar, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Propagation (Opus 3) by Naama Tsabar, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Propagation (Opus 3) by Naama Tsabar, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Propagation (Opus 3) by Naama Tsabar, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Propagation (Opus 3) by Naama Tsabar, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Propagation (Opus 3) by Naama Tsabar, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Propagation (Opus 3) by Naama Tsabar, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Propagation (Opus 3) by Naama Tsabar, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Polyphonic Playground by Studio PSK, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Polyphonic Playground by Studio PSK, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Polyphonic Playground by Studio PSK, Photo by Katy Davies. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Polyphonic Playground by Studio PSK, Photo: Courtesy of artist
Polyphonic Playground by Studio PSK, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Polyphonic Playground by Studio PSK, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Polyphonic Playground by Studio PSK, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Polyphonic Playground by Studio PSK, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Knotted Gate Presence Weave by MSHR, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Knotted Gate Presence Weave by MSHR, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Knotted Gate Presence Weave by MSHR, Photo: Courtesy of artist
Knotted Gate Presence Weave by MSHR, Photo: Courtesy of artist
Sine Body by Julianne Swartz, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Sine Body by Julianne Swartz, Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Sine Body by Julianne Swartz, Photo by Chris Kendall. Courtesy of the artist
Sine Body by Julianne Swartz, Photo by Chris Kendall. Courtesy of the artist
Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Photo by Jenna Bascom. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.
Back

Articles you also might like

Ernst Gamperl

Since winning the LOEWE Craft Prize in 2017, Ernst Gamperl has been pursuing more essential & archaic formats. ‘Tree of Life’ is his once-in-a-lifetime project, as he transforms a huge 230-year-old oak tree into 67 wrought vessels that embody his excellence in woodturning and experimental patinas.

“Gritty, wild stuff”, is how Schloss Hollenegg for Design and mischer’traxler studio describe the presented investigations of the role of design and its relationship with our natural environment in their exhibition during this year’s Vienna Design Week.

Developed by well-known designer Jiang Qiong Er and France’s Hermès Group, SHANG XIA aims to celebrate a contemporary fine living lifestyle. Impressed and fascinated by the attempt to embody time and emotion in objects, TLmag sat down with the CEO and Art Director to reflect on her experience.