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Fourquié’s Tribe at Galerie Gosserez

As trends shift towards ethnic undertones, Parisian designer Piergil Fourquié offers up a level of refined interpretation. Presented exclusively with Galerie Gosserez, Tribe arrives as a genealogy of tables, stools and mirrors, clad in bespoke metal screen-printed surfaces; a technique borrowed from...
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As trends shift towards ethnic undertones, Parisian designer Piergil Fourquié offers up a level of refined interpretation. Presented exclusively with Galerie Gosserez, Tribe arrives as a genealogy of tables, stools and mirrors, clad in bespoke metal screen-printed surfaces; a technique borrowed from leather production. Cast in tinted glass, base structures refract as monumental forms. However minimal and reduced in presence, all objects share the same anthropomorphic origins, mired in anthropology and Saharan emulation.

Galerie Gosserez: 3 Rue Debelleyme, Paris

Pedestal table / stool "Maasaï"
Pedestal table / stool "Maasaï"
Pedestal table / stool "Maasaï"
Pedestal table / stool "Maasaï"
Coffee table "Maasaï"
Coffee table "Maasaï"
"Maasaï" collection
"Maasaï" collection
Detail of the silkscreened leather top
silkscreened leather top
Low table "Mursi"
Low table "Mursi"
Low table "Mursi"
Low table "Mursi"
Witch's eye mirror "Zulu"
Witch's eye mirror "Zulu"
Witch's eye mirror "Zulu"
Witch's eye mirror "Zulu"
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