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Werner Aisslinger’s Summer House

On breaks from constant travel and long weeks spent working at his Berlin studio, renowned German designer Werner Aisslinger spends a few weeks every summer at his secluded Italian farmhouse. Set back from the Apulian coastline, the quaint villa enjoys sweeping views of the Adriatic Sea. For Aisslinger...
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Photography by Patricia Parinejad
On breaks from constant travel and long weeks spent working at his Berlin studio, renowned German designer Werner Aisslinger spends a few weeks every summer at his secluded Italian farmhouse. Set back from the Apulian coastline, the quaint villa enjoys sweeping views of the Adriatic Sea. For Aisslinger and his fashion designer and editor wife Nicola Bramigk, the home is a ‘design free-zone.’ Much of the space has been tailored for optimum relaxation and reflection. For instance, a flat rooftop terrace features a large outdoor bed while a stone patio submerges a dining table in an ancient olive grove. Far from the pressures of the city life, Aisslinger and Bramigk can be found preparing handmade pasta for late-night meals in the stunning reportage captured by photographer Patricia Parinejad.
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