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Dutch Invertuals’ Harvest

After a successful run in Milan and Paris, Dutch Invertuals’ Harvest showcase traveled to London Design Festival this month. The manifesto-like collection revealed how young design talents are finding new efficient and self sufficient ways to practice and address the pressing issues of today and tomorrow: calling for a drastic change in economics; our consumption and production.

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Photography by courtesy of Dutch Invertuals

Does design have the ability to change the course of humanity and its habits? For better or worse, the obvious answer is apparent in material culture, advertisement, and mass consumption. It is perhaps better to ask whether or not design can inspire change through less conspicuous means: conceptual speculation, bold material experimentations and reoriented approaches; reconfigured function and poetic expression; elements that seem to borrow from the exalted realm of non-functional fine art. However, such a judgement marginalises the important leaps the expanded field of design has made in the past few decades, and even more so in the past 10 years.

Incorporating the even more downplayed but crucial domain of craft, young talents have forged a transcendent redefinition of design that sheds hierarchy and cliché; the belief that the discipline should only answer consumer demands with simple, stylised solutions. In fact, it is through bold reconsideration and reconfiguration that the very notion of function is addressed. Works no longer fall into the traditional categorisations of furniture, lighting, graphics, and fashion design but rather reveal a more holistic yet essentialist methodology. Today’s talents have drawn a balance between the polarities of abstraction and application.

Eindhoven-based curatorial initiative Dutch Invertuals – headed by Wendy Plomp – has brought together a fledgling group of emerging talents; from, based, or having studied in the Netherlands. Since 2009, 15 collective exhibitions have addressed both bitterly realistic and ethereally romantic themes through non-polemic yet proactive means; emulating much of what makes the field dynamic today. Always based on a thematic prompt, the showcase reveals nonconformist designs that challenge the conventions of use, materiality, and form. Dramatic scenographies support rather than overpower the various works on show. Too often conceptual work relies heavily on message rather than accessible aesthetic presentation. Matching the aptitude of its growing talent base, Dutch Invertuals exhibition always seduce the eyes.   

This year’s Harvest showcase traveled from Milan Design Week in April, D’Days Paris in June, and the London Design Festival this month (21-24 September, at the Old Truman Brewery). Featuring works by Bram Vanderbeke, Bastiaan de Nennie (featured in TLmag 26), Carlo Lorenzetti, Edhv, Hongjie Yang, Kirstie van Noort & Xandra van der Eijk, Léa Baert, Mila Chorbadzhieva, Philipp Weber (featured in TLmag 26), Sigve Knutson, Thomas Ballouhey, and Tijmen Smeulders, the exhibition undertook the complex and timely issues of self-sufficiency and efficiency. The theme took an cautionary yet optimistic stance in light of the political, social, and environmental crises ahead. Far from its the traditional cradle to cradle codification of sustainability, the philosophy was expanded with profound questions about our production cycles, economic systems, and modes of consumption. the Harvest exhibition text made a bold statement about our future: “We will rebalance supply and demand disconnected from profit. Ultimately, wealth and power will have to bow to responsibility. We will reap what we sow.”

Projected as a future-proof manifesto, the collection of works on view not only demonstrated the latest push toward advanced material experimentation and highly visceral treatment but also how these talents are looking back to primal fundamental to shape their own resourcefulness. Working in a time of tight budgets and shifting cultural norms, many have used these constraints to establish flexible practice; working with uncommon components to create direct solutions or alluding metaphors that spark awareness. 

Philipp Weber looked to the personal and societal history of coal production in Germany’s Ruhr region and produced new objects from its byproduct using an newly developed technology. The resulting From Below vessels were a glaring reminder of humanity’s role in environmental degradation but also sustainable solutions that repurpose waste material. as above, so below was developed by Kirstie Van Noort and Xandra van der Eijk to alleviate rapidly depleting natural resources. The speculative project, presented as a science lab, considered the potential of extraterrestrial matter, a renewable material than falls to earth by the tons each year. Poetically yet pragmatically, Van Noort and van der Eijk proposed the idea of new stardust mining industry. Hongjie Yang explored the ‘wicked concept’ of the anthropocence: the complete control and manipulation of nature by man. Metallic Transformations was conceived symbolically as a new ‘natural’ material produced using thermal spray; a new aesthetic for an overwhelming artificial environment. Amongst the various projects, the prevalence of a new archeology, raw matter recently generated, and pressing briefs that demand reuse uncovered a new zeitgeist; built with primal sense of survival and unlimited intuition.

Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Photo: Ronald Smits
Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Photo: Ronald Smits
Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Photo: Ronald Smits
Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Photo: Ronald Smits
Photo: Ronald Smits
Photo: Ronald Smits
Group, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Group, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Harvest curator and Dutch Invertuals Founder / Director Wendy Plomp, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Harvest curator and Dutch Invertuals Founder / Director Wendy Plomp, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Thomas Ballouhey, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Thomas Ballouhey, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Thomas Ballouhey
Recondition by Thomas Ballouhey, Photo: Ronald Smits
Sigve Knutson, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Sigve Knutson, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Sigve Knutson
Hammered Anodized Aluminum Shades by Sigve Knutson, Photo: Ronald Smits
Philipp Weber, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Philipp Weber, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Philipp Weber
From Below by Philipp Weber, Photo: Ronald Smits
Mila Chorbadzhieva, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Mila Chorbadzhieva, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Mila Chorbadzhieva
Sound Mirrors by Mila Chorbadzhieva, Photo: Ronald Smits
Lea Baert, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Léa Baert, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Léa Baert
Léa Baert, Photo: Ronald Smits
Kirstie & Xandra, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Kirstie & Xandra, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Kirstie van Noort & Xandra van der Eijk
As above, so below by Kirstie van Noort & Xandra van der Eijk, Photo: Ronald Smits
Hongjie Yang, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Hongjie Yang, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Hongjie Yang, Photo: Ronald Smits
Metallic Transformation by Hongjie Yang, Photo: Ronald Smits
Edhv, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Edhv, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Edhv
Edhv
Carlo Lorenzetti, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Carlo Lorenzetti, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Carlo Lorenzetti
Lighthouse, breach bowl, scroll wheel by Carlo Lorenzetti, Photo by Ronald Smits
Bram Vanderbeke, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Bram Vanderbeke, Photo: Lonneke van der Palen
Bram Vanderbeke
New Primitives by Bram Vanderbeke, Photo by Ronald Smits
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