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Textile Art & Weavers

In this TLmag online edition we have bundled the best articles about Textile Art & Weavers

Commemorating 13 years since Noa Eshkol’s passing, TLmag revisits Gunia Nowik’s personal journey to Eshkol’s historic home in Holon (Israel) which was – and still is – the center of collaborative study for the Eshkol-Wachman Movement Notation (EWMN) and Eshkol’s dance repertoire.

On her old wooden loom, Marie Hazard weaves stories with miles of thread. Through a long and complex process, she brings together traditional hand weaving techniques and digital printing technology to explore contemporary social and cultural conditions.

Playing with scale and contradiction, Pae White is unafraid to push the limits of what a material or tool can do. Her ability to capture fleeting moments like a puff of cigarette smoke or the reflection of shiny tinfoil within a woven surface challenges our perceptions and adds a bit of magic into our everyday lives.

It’s no surprise that this Swedish artist has a background in both architecture and dance, as her handmade geometric shapes are studies in structural composition and movement. Bella talks to TLmag about her fascination with interfaces, the truth about intuition, and the similarities between yarn and smartphones.

Using various textile techniques like knitting, embroidery and tufting, Paris-based textile artist Manon Daviet transposes her drawings into tapestries, creating what she calls “volume paintings”. Here, she talks TLmag through her multidisciplinary practice, finding inspiration in comic books and her embracing of mysticism in nature.

Multi-disciplinary artist Igshaan Adams unpacks his identity through ritualistic performances and his use of handicrafts such as embroidery and beading. Delving into personal topics that look toward the environment in which he was raised, he resolves conflicting identities in a quest for spiritual enlightenment.

Greek artist Athina Ioannou maximizes and reinterprets painting through minimal and economic means. Her sensuous ‘abstract’ painting – what she refers to as ‘plus-painting’ – arises from the ‘intensification’ of ready-made carriers through the patient all-over saturation of her work with linseed oil.

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