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Intimate Explorations: Next to the Skin

Intimacy is something both universal and allusive. Exploring this somewhat slippery feeling are 12 artist installations at the exhibition ‘Next to the Skin’

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What does it mean to be intimate? Is it a share secret? A sensory-fuelled feeling? A moment of dialogue? An intuitive perception of something? And, what does intimacy mean in an ever-increasing digital age? Could intimacy take on a new meaning behind our screens? 

Curators Olfa Mathey and Nelly Van Oost posed the question of intimacy to 12 artist who created installations for Next to the Skin at Galerie BeCraft, Belgium. The exhibition delves into the world of materializing intimacy — be that through shape, texture, feel, concept or literal or figurative representations.

On display are works by Bande De (B), Maria Bang Espersen (DK), Julien Dutertre (F/B), Tatjana Giorgadse (DE/GA), Nils Hint (IE), Caroline Hofman (F), Katja Koditz (DE), Zizi Lazer (F/B), Réka Lőrincz (HU), Ophélie Mac (F/B), Thibault Madeline (B), Romina Remmo (B).

‘Next to the Skin’ will be on display until January 20

Cover image:  Things Change by Maria Band Espersen
Glass, Window Glass, rock, brick

Intimacy
Depth by Remmo Romina White stitched textile
Intimacy
Sunday cleaning by Reka Lorincz
Intimacy
Tools of Love - Eva and Adam by Nils Hint High carbon steel
Intimacy
Un Cerf en Hiver by Mathey Olga Wires
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