×

Subscribe to our newsletter

Highlights From the Previous Week, Partnered Events and Haikus. View our Newsletter archive

Still Alive by Antonio Aricò for Seletti

Playing on the age-old qualities of still lifes, Italian designer Antonio Aricò debuts Still Alive – a set of desk accessories – for Seletti during Art Basel / Miami Beach. In the guise of adoring our workspaces with tactile objects, this new series of aesthetically pleasing yet functional objects...
Scroll right to read more ›
Text by
Photography by Matteo Rossi

Playing on the age-old qualities of still lifes, Italian designer Antonio Aricò debuts Still Alive – a set of desk accessories – for Seletti during Art Basel / Miami Beach. In the guise of adoring our workspaces with tactile objects, this new series of aesthetically pleasing yet functional objects arrives as a “graceful detournement:” moving objects from one context to another by infusing different function and storytelling. As an eclectic arrangement of forms, quotidian users are able to break from their mutinous routine and interact with different programmes: a terracotta pitcher can hold rulers or other elongated utensils while a brass cup can hold regularly used pens and pencils. A “celadon” resin pyramid holds one’s most-prized treasures and a spherical magnifying glass helps them to read more closely.

Still Alive by Antonio Aricò
Still Alive by Antonio Aricò
a.aricò doodle 2
stillalive_09
Back

Articles you also might like

Using various textile techniques like knitting, embroidery and tufting, Paris-based textile artist Manon Daviet transposes her drawings into tapestries, creating what she calls “volume paintings”. Here, she talks TLmag through her multidisciplinary practice, finding inspiration in comic books and her embracing of mysticism in nature.

Ever since he was a child, Mounir Fatmi has been curious about the transformation of objects – how, with a slight change of context or position, they can take on entirely new meanings. As a contemporary artist, he regularly goes back into the archive, transforming materials into a highly charged body of work with cleverly subversive reflections on contemporary culture.

Cape Town-based, multi-disciplinary artist Igshaan Adams expresses and unpacks his identity through his art. In ritualistic performances and through the use of handcrafts such as embroidery and beading, he delves into personal topics that look toward the environment in which he was raised, resolving conflicting identities in a quest for spiritual enlightenment.