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Light & Shadow by Nendo for Marsotto

Nendo’s gravity-defying “Nod” side table was the star of the “light & shadow” exhibition in Milan last month, featuring a number of new designs for marble specialists Marsotto Edizioni. The table’s overtly graphic quality resembles nothing so much as a 3D rendering that has been aggressively skewed...
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Text by Ray Hu

Nendo’s gravity-defying “Nod” side table was the star of the “light & shadow” exhibition in Milan last month, featuring a number of new designs for marble specialists Marsotto Edizioni. The table’s overtly graphic quality resembles nothing so much as a 3D rendering that has been aggressively skewed with an errant mouse click. Physically rendered in either black or white marble, the dynamic form easily punctuates any space with its oblique geometry. It is in fact the weight of the pitched legs that affords the stability of the piece, transcending the heft of the material itself.

Along with “Nod”, the Fuorisalone saw the launch of the Pacman-like “Gap” and clever “Split” tables, as well as tabletop objects such as the “Under” vessels and “Sphere & Cone”. Starting with a marble cube as a proverbial building block, the former is “draped” with a saucer, while the latter is hollowed out to function as either a candleholder (“Sphere“) or passive smartphone speaker (“Cone“).

For the presentation at Spazio Bigli, the tables were exhibited according to the logic of the “unsightly” pillars of the symmetrical space, such that the binary color options formed a mirror image down the central axis of the gallery.

"light & shadow" by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Takumi Ota)
"light & shadow" by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Takumi Ota)
"light & shadow" by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Takumi Ota)
"light & shadow" by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Takumi Ota)
"light & shadow" by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Takumi Ota)
"light & shadow" by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Takumi Ota)
"light & shadow" by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Takumi Ota)
"light & shadow" by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Takumi Ota)
"Nod" tables by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Nod" tables by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Nod" tables by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Nod" tables by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Nod" tables by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Nod" tables by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
 "Nod" tables by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Nod" tables by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Gap" table by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Gap" table by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Gap" table by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Gap" table by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Split" by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Split" by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Split" tables by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Split" tables by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Split" tables by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Split" tables by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Cone" speaker by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Cone" speaker by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Sphere" candleholder by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
"Sphere" candleholder by Nendo for Marsotto (Photo by Akihiro Yoshida)
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